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Posts Tagged ‘potatoes’

How many times have you done this? You make a dish without a recipe and it turns out to be something you can’t wait to make again. The problem is, the next time you want to make it you can’t remember how you made it or where you wrote it down. Hoping I’ve learned my lesson, publishing this recipe means we can always make piping hot cheesy scalloped potatoes with hamburger.

Cheesy scalloped potatoes and hamburger

I hadn’t lost the recipe for this fresh potato dish. But I lost my recipe for scalloped potatoes and ham and haven’t been able to find it for almost two years. Not only did I want to find it again but my (someday) mother-in-law asked me for it. Lo and behold I accidentally found it on Sunday, on my blog, in a draft page. So I adapted it to make a smaller meal with hamburger since I didn’t have any ham. It’s basically the cheesy potatoes and ham recipe halved but without the onion and garlic, although they would be fantastic in here too. (Marie, I can finally give you the recipe!)

That wasn’t the only recipe I’ve written down and wound up in a desperate hunt for—somewhere hiding in my house is a jotted-down recipe for s’mores cookies that I want to find before we take a trip to the lake next week. Who knows what other random Post-It note recipes I’ll find in my search. Wish me luck because from what I remember, you’ll want the recipe too.

Cheesy scalloped potatoes and hamburger

4 large or 5 medium Russet or Gold potatoes, thinly sliced

1 pound ground sirloin or ground beef

1/2 teaspoon onion salt

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/4 cup butter

4 cups milk

1/4 cup flour

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

salt & pepper to taste

2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese, or your cheese of choice

  1. Fry the hamburger in a large pan with onion salt and garlic powder until cooked thoroughly. (Fry with onion and garlic if desired.) Drain if needed and set aside in a separate bowl.
  2. In the same pan over medium-high heat, add the butter, milk, flour, nutmeg, and salt and pepper. Whisk until thickened, about 10 minutes. It will be more like a bean soup consistency.
  3. Grease a 9×13 pan with spray or butter.
  4. Spread half of the potatoes in the bottom of the pan. Top with half of the hamburger. Pour half of the milk mixture over the hamburger and top with half of the cheese. Repeat the layers.
  5. Cover with foil and bake at 375° for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 30 minutes or until the potatoes are fork tender, the entire pan is bubbling, and the cheese begins to brown. Refrigerate any leftovers and warm in a frying pan the next day.

Cheesy wishes,

Staci

 

 

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As I unwrapped garlic cloves to make Garlicky Potatoes, Green Beans, and Cauliflower (super fabulous dish), I remembered that there was a time, it only had to happen once, that I didn’t know the difference between a clove of garlic and a bulb of garlic. Which means, a recipe called for two cloves of garlic and I used two bulbs. Yes, two bulbs of garlic.

garlic

Obviously, I’m mostly self-taught in the kitchen, especially when it comes to cooking. Remember how I used to smash tomatoes trying to cut them using the wrong knife until Jason told me to use a serrated one? (Apology to tomatoes and making pico de gallo.) Well if you cook with your kids like Stacey Viera does, you’ll want to add tomatoes and garlic to your Kitchen Tips 101 list.

use a serrated knife to dice a tomato

Thank goodness I figured out the garlic clove/bulb thing (and slicing tomatoes) because otherwise my favorite Chicken Black Bean Salsa would scare vampires away.

Chicken Black Bean Salsa

And my summer sausage salami cilantro pizza would go from oven to trash in five minutes or less.

summer sausage and salami cilantro pizza

For more recipes using garlic and tomatoes, flip through my Potatoes and Vegetables Pinterest boards.

Something else I wish I would’ve known before attending a business lunch at Sushi Masa, you don’t eat edamame pods.

Sweet garlic breath,

Staci

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Leftover baked potatoes can come back the next day as baked potatoes. But when there’s a fried solution to getting them back on your plate, let’s take the road to crispy town.

loaded fried baked potatoes

The recipe isn’t precise and other than the butter, olive oil, and the potatoes you can modify these smashed vegetables to taste.

Melt the olive oil and butter in a pan over medium heat. Add the garlic powder and onion salt OR the chopped onion and garlic. Place the potatoes in pan. Using a potato masher or thick wooden spoon press down on the potato, flattening to approximately ½ an inch. Dust with salt and pepper.

smashed baked potatoes

Fry, covered, on medium heat until crispy and then flip potatoes to crisp the other side and add a pinch more salt and pepper.

fried baked potatoes

Remove from pan and cover with grated cheese, bacon, and a dollop of sour cream.

Smashed and fried baked potatoes

Olive oil

Butter

OR butter with olive oil

Garlic powder

Onion salt

OR chopped onion and garlic

Baked potatoes

Salt

Pepper

Shredded cheese

Sour cream

Crumbled bacon

  1. Melt the olive oil and butter in a pan over medium heat. Add the garlic powder and onion salt OR the chopped onion and garlic.
  2. Place the potatoes in pan. Using a potato masher or thick wooden spoon press down on the potato, flattening to approximately ½ an inch. Dust with salt and pepper.
  3. Fry, covered, on medium heat until crispy and then flip potatoes to crisp the other side and add a pinch more salt and pepper.
  4. Remove from pan and cover with grated cheese, bacon, and a dollop of sour cream.

Add eggs, toast, and a slice of ham or last night’s leftover steak and you have a hearty man-breakfast.

Crispy, starchy wishes

Staci

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It’s frustrating to get home and open a bag of store-bought potatoes only to find that one is so badly rotten it infected each potato it came in contact with. But you squeezed the potatoes before you chose a bag, right?

potatoes

There are people who slice off the spoiled parts and use the remaining potatoes but I can’t stomach it so I throw the bad ones out. Plus I live in the country so it’s not a quick run back to the store if the situation leaves me with fewer potatoes than what I immediately need. (Maybe I’m making homemade hash browns for smoky ham and cheddar hash brown casserole or the T Boys hot dog casserole.)

Yesterday a lady who introduced herself as Sheila busted me sniffing a bag of potatoes in the produce aisle. She asked what it does. Not wanting to look like a crazy person sniffing vegetables, I explained. A few years ago I started smelling the potatoes before I even put a bag in my cart. There are little holes in the plastic bags and the netted bags are easy – inhale inside the bag (never put a plastic bag over your head or you will look crazy or suffocate). It should only smell like dirt. Even if you gently squeeze some of the potatoes and they seem fine, you will definitely smell if there is something rotten in the package.

It has unscientifically worked for me every time.

Earthy wishes,
Staci

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